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P234586DN

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United KingdomUnited Kingdom
 

United KingdomKGK34D

Classic Jaguar Saloon photo

57 more photos below

Record Creation: Entered on 20 June 2022.

 

Photos of P234586DN

Click slide for larger image. This car has 58 photos. (Dates are when image was uploaded.)

Exterior Photos (15)

Uploaded June 2022:

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Uploaded September 2017:

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Uploaded December 2011:

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Details Photos: Exterior (21)

Uploaded June 2022:

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Uploaded September 2017:

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Detail Photos: Interior (14)

Uploaded June 2022:

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Uploaded September 2017:

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Detail Photos: Engine (7)

Uploaded June 2022:

2022-06-20
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Uploaded September 2017:

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Detail Photos: Other (1)

Uploaded September 2017:

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Comments

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2011-12-10 21:42:43 | pauls writes:

Car was at auction in 2011
www.classic-auctions.com/Auctions/19-10-2011-ThePavilionGardens-1293/1966JaguarM ...

Auction description:
Lot Number: 72
1966 Jaguar MK II 3.8 Litre
Sold For £10,470
Reg Number: KGK 34D
Chassis Number: P234586-DM
Engine Number: KG2486-8
Cc: 3442
Body Colour: Met. Opalescent blue
Trim Colour: Cream
MOT ExpiryDate: July 2012

'KGK 34D' is a right-hand drive 1966 Jaguar MKII which left the factory as a 3.8 litre model fitted with the desirable four-speed manual plus overdrive gearbox. It was reportedly treated to an extensive restoration in 2008 that included a bare metal respray and overhaul of its replacement 3.4 litre engine. This was followed last year by the thorough renovation of the interior, during which upgraded leather from a later car was employed and new carpets and headlining installed. The vendor now regards the bodywork, paintwork, trim, engine and gearbox as all being in "good" order and is selling the car complete with such niceties as a stainless steel exhaust and Moto-Lita steering wheel, plus an MOT into July 2012.

PLEASE NOTE: Since the catalogue went to press we have been informed that this lot has been fitted with a replacement 3.4 litre MKII engine (in place of its original 3.8 litre unit)

2017-09-17 03:59:15 | pauls writes:

Car returned to auction 7/17
www.handh.co.uk/buy/1966-jaguar-mk-ii/9176

Auction description:
Date 26/07/2017
Location Imperial War Museum Duxford
Lot No 14
Make Jaguar
Model MK II
Year 1966
Vehicle Registration KGK 34D
Chassis Number P234586-DM
Engine Number KG2486-8
CC 3442
Body Colour Blue
Trim Colour Red
MOT Expiry July 2018
Estimate £28000 - 32000*

- Treated to an extensive restoration in 2008 that included a bare metal respray
- Interior retrim by B.W Cates of Bournemouth and new wire wheels in 2012
- Offered with a collection of invoices, MOT's and photographs of the restoration

'KGK 34D' is a right-hand drive 1966 Jaguar MKII which left the factory as a 3.8 litre model fitted with the desirable four-speed manual plus overdrive gearbox. It was reportedly treated to an extensive restoration in 2008 that included a bare metal respray and overhaul of its replacement 3.4 litre MKII engine. Having received an interior retrim in 2012 by B.W Cates of Bournemouth and new wire wheels, the vendor now regards the bodywork, paintwork, trim, engine and gearbox as all being in "very good" order and is offering the Jaguar with a collection of invoices and old MOT's, photographs of the restoration and a current MOT certificate into July 2018.

2022-06-20 07:58:36 | pauls writes:

Car returns to auction 6/20/22

themarket.bonhams.com/en/listings/jaguar/mk-ii/f226d28c-d0f6-440d-9b02-f3e3cf3ff ...

Auction description:

Seller masters

Location: The Market HQ, Abingdon, United Kingdom

Seller Type: Private

Odometer Reading: 12986

Chassis Number: P234586-DM

Engine: 3442

Gearbox: manual

Steering position: RHD

Colour: Blue

Interior: Red

Estimated Price: £25,000 - £35,000

Finished in a discreet dark metallic blue, you might be forgiven for thinking this wonderful MKII Jaguar is as staid as George Roper’s cardigan. But you’d be wrong because it also has a wonderfully vivid bright red leather interior, a four-speed manual gearbox and 210bhp at its disposal, therefore making it a street sleeper half a century before street sleepers were even a thing.

First registered in April 1966, it has had just four previous keepers – and careful ones at that if its current condition is anything to go by - and that careful curation was supported by what we are told was a full body-off between 2008 and 2012; please see the receipts and photographs here in the advert for more details. The vendor has owned it since 2014.

He’s always kept in in a Carcoon during the winter and a locked garage in the summer, and he tells us that this regimen has preserved it year after year in the same condition. Only now being sold to free up some space – he’s got an extensive classic car collection – it’s a cracking example that’s being sold with no reserve!

On the Outside

The dark blue metallic coachwork is stunning. Much more discreet and subtle than the usual red, silver or white, it’s almost black in certain lights, giving the car an upmarket menace we love.

It’s in great shape too, with good shutlines and great panel alignment thanks to the restoration we mentioned earlier. New rear spats were purchased in 2011 along with some other body parts in 2012 (please see attached invoices for the full details of what was purchased), which makes us think that this is the point at which the bodywork was restored and painted.

There’s plenty of good chrome trim on it too, including those iconic twin spotlights that are a crucial component of the MKII look. Speaking of which, the Jaguar ‘leaper’ is present and correct, and there are a pair of black and silver numberplates to finish it all off.

The 15-inch, centrelock, chromed wire wheels appear to have been fitted new in 2012 and look as good now as they did then, which isn’t too much of a surprise as the MOT history suggests that it has only covered a couple of thousand miles in that time. The tyres, Hankook on the front and Forceum on the rear, are in great shape and have good levels of tread.

Problems are few. There are some swirl marks from over-eager polishing that could do with being polished out but, aside from the usual minor stonechips and scuffs that every car collects no matter how carefully it’s driven, there’s nothing for the new owner to do other than to remedy some tiny rust spots on the door shuts, sort out a small crack in the paint on the lower edge of the offside rear wing (slide 130), and flatten some paint imperfections.

Oh, and while it is badged as a 3.8-litre model (and the V5 registration document says it is too) it isn’t.

On the Inside

The interior has been retrimmed in red leather. The work was done by B. W. Cates and comprised recovered seats, door cards, A, B, C, and D post covers, the centre console, the parcel shelf and the underdash trims. The work cost £2,500 in total but was worth every penny as it still looks stunning.

The retrimmed seats are still firm and supportive with that old school bounce to them that lets you know you’re sitting in a 1960’s Jaguar. They’re free of rips, tears and other damage too and the only sign they aren’t still brand new is some very light creasing to the edge of the driver’s seat. The rears seats look like they might never have been sat on and their occupants have access to a pair of fold-down picnics tables, which is a lovely period touch and something your children or grandchildren will never tire of.

Not that the driver and front seat passenger should feel neglected because they get to gaze upon a row of toggle switches and classic Smiths’ dials. Plus, acres of wood veneer and red leather and some of the neatest labelling in the business. The Jaguar also benefits from a pair of Britax Auto-Lok front seatbelts and there’s a classic twin-spindle Clarion radio and tape deck in there as well.

The headlining looks to be good still (we’re told it was new when the seats and interior was retrimmed), remaining taut and clean.

The boot contains a jack and a spare wire wheel, albeit not in the same great condition as the rest of the wheels. The rubber seal around the perimeter of the boot aperture is tired too and would benefit from being replaced. The rest is good though, and lifting the carpets shows only superficial surface rust on top of solid metal.

Other work to do is limited. Aside from cracked veneer on the front and top of the dashboard, the chromed handbrake handle isn’t to the same high standard as the rest of the interior. Neither issue is at all bad and they only really stick out because everything else in there is so good. (Oh, that all our classic car problems should be so small…)

Underneath

The engine bay is neat without being fussy. Those of us with a touch of OCD might want to tidy it up a little (one of the HT leads isn’t braided, for example, and there are some ugly modern crimped electrical connectors) but we reckon 99% of you would be very happy with it as it is.

More importantly, it’s clean and the engine fires up readily. The owner tells us that it “drives very well”, which is, in part at least, due to the £3,800 power steering system he’s had fitted. This is the real McCoy comprising a proper hydraulic system that includes a new alternator and pump. Yes, he could have saved a lot of money by fitting one of the electric systems that are available but he was keen to keep the car’s steering feel, something the cheaper alternative destroys.

He’s also had a new clutch pressure plate fitted plus a new rear main oil seal, although he admits the latter still weeps a little, pointing out that no-one ever gets this seal leak-free.

The underside is very clean and solid, with only a few areas of peeling underseal to sort. Still, a couple of hours with a wire brush and a pot of decent underseal would sort that, leaving it fighting fit and combat-ready for the coming winter, should you choose to use it all year round.

History Highlights

While it isn’t currently MOT’d, the online MOT history doesn’t show anything of concern but then the history file does show plenty of expenditure over the years, so this isn’t too much of a surprise.

It has a current V5 registration document and a copy of the Jaguar Drivers’ Club magazine from October 2021, in which it features.

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